Topic types:  Locked, Sticky, Locked Sticky


Feedback to the editors about the zine not relating to any specific issue.

Moderator: Editors

User avatar

Editor Emeritus

Posts: 2379

Joined: December 31, 1969, 08:00:00 PM

Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Post July 27, 2004, 03:23:09 PM

Topic types:  Locked, Sticky, Locked Sticky

Just as a matter of curiousity -- is a Sticky Topic one that persists over time, or one that is controversial, or something else entirely?<br><br>I presume that a Locked Topic can no longer have posts added to it (right?) ...<br><br>But in that case, what would the point be of a Locked Sticky Topic (persisting over time(?) but not accepting new posts?)<br><br>The YaBB Help function doesn't seem to cover this, or if it does, the info is hidden away in some obscure subtopic.<br><br>Rob? Dan?<br><br>Robert M.
You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.

Jack London (1876-1916)

Critic

Posts: 125

Joined: December 31, 1969, 08:00:00 PM

Location: Halifax, NS., Canada

Post July 29, 2004, 07:43:50 AM

Re: Topic types:  Locked, Sticky, Locked Stic

I don't about Sticky Topics. Do you mean Sticky Threads? <br><br>The way it should work is;<br><br>» What are sticky threads?<br>Threads that "stick" to the top of a board. Usually used for announcements, readmes etc<br><br>» What are Locked Topics? <br>Topcs that can no longer be posted to. The moderator usually posts a message in the thread as to why the thread was locked.<br><br>A Sticky Thread in a Locked Topic would be the message from the moderator saying why the thread was locked.<br><br>Kevin
User avatar

Editor Emeritus

Posts: 2379

Joined: December 31, 1969, 08:00:00 PM

Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Post July 29, 2004, 08:59:40 AM

Re: Topic types:  Locked, Sticky, Locked Sticky

... Nope, I just checked, and the legend that appears when you open a particular Forum (before you open a particular post) says 'Topic' not 'Thread'.<br><br>There appear to be Forums (e.g., 'July 2004') and Topics, but no 'threads' in the sense that the old lettercol had them.  'Replies' are any post after the first one in a Topic; they may or may not quote a previous post in the Topic, but they are not 'nested'; there is only one level within a Topic.  This means that you MUST use the 'quote' feature to indicate that you are commenting on a particular remark in a previous post, rather than simply 'reply'ing to that specific post.  (In fact, you CAN'T select which post you are 'reply'ing to.)<br><br>In that sense, the old lettercol had a structural advantage at the lowest level, while this YaBB version allows for better overall organization.<br><br>Robert M.
Last edited by Robert_Moriyama on July 29, 2004, 09:11:49 AM, edited 1 time in total.
You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.

Jack London (1876-1916)

Critic

Posts: 125

Joined: December 31, 1969, 08:00:00 PM

Location: Halifax, NS., Canada

Post July 29, 2004, 10:02:27 AM

Re: Topic types:  Locked, Sticky, Locked Stic

Ok, I see what you are referring to. In YaBB, the Forums, such as July 2004, Administrivia etc. are called Topics. The messages posted under those topics are Threads. The subject we are posting under is the "Topic types: Locked, Sticky, Locked Sticky" thread. While it's not the same as the old forum, it is, as you say, more organized. It also makes it harder for two people to carry on a one on one conversation, so leaves it open for anyone to jump in on a given topic.<br><br>Sometimes it would be nice to choose which message in a thread to open, like you could do with the old forum. Unfortunatley, that option is not available in YaBB. <br><br>The quote feature can also be very handy when you wish to re-visit a point in a previous message in the same thread. You don't even need to use an actual quote, you can change it to show
Replying to Robert M.
.<br><br>Kevin

Return to Administrivia

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.