Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski


Tell us what you thought about the December 2012 issue!

Moderator: Editors

Master Critic

Posts: 3595

Joined: September 17, 2008, 10:10:20 PM

Post December 21, 2012, 04:07:20 PM

Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski

I didn't enjoy this one as much as I do a couple hundred other poems by him (I've read about 400), but Robin is in a class by himself. Rating this one a 3 on a scale of 1-10 (a scale by his standards) would register a 15 to 20 on a average poet's scale of 1-10 by comparrison.

Tao wrote me regarding last month's flash challenge, that no one phonetically writes out language anymore, however Robin does not care for rules and confinements (much like Richard Tornello) and telling him he "has" to do something a certain way is inviting a scathing poetic retort.

But I like the way Robin writes without regard for any motivation, except for his own inspiration. Writing a work, based on another person's work takes insight to match the style and feel of the work being paid homage to and of course, Robin has the literary and imaginative powers to do it!
Last edited by Mark Edgemon on December 21, 2012, 10:09:11 PM, edited 1 time in total.

Editor Emeritus

Posts: 2528

Joined: December 31, 1969, 08:00:00 PM

Location: Mass, USA

Post December 21, 2012, 08:51:10 PM

Re: Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski

Mark Edgemon wrote:Tao wrote me regarding last month's flash challenge, that no one phonetically writes out language anymore, however Robin does not care for rules and confinements (much like Richard Tornello) and telling him he "has" to do something a certain way is inviting a scathing poetic retort.

But I like the way Robin writes without regard for any motivation, except for his own inspiration. Writing a work, based on another person's work takes insight to match the style and feel of the work being paid homage to and of course, Robin has the literary and imaginative powers to do it!


It might be a matter where it works better in poetry than a prose story. The times I've seen an author want to make a point of an accent, I think I've seen it described as a drawl etc, then the rest of the piece was in standard English. Maybe in some cases you need to leave it to the Reader's stereotype image of an accent and hope it doesn't materially affect the story. We used to have an anecdote about an elderly aunt of mine. She would want some "bald ham". After a few rounds of confusion in total desperate frustration she thundered, "b - o - i - l - e - d ... bald!"

It just occurred to me I have no idea how to phonetically render an Indian accent. So maybe the lexigraphic stuff only works for about 3 famous stereotypical accents.

Master Critic

Posts: 1609

Joined: June 05, 2011, 02:05:03 AM

Post December 21, 2012, 09:46:46 PM

Re: Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski

thanks Mark, 3 is one of my favorite numbers with the addition of +10: 13, 23, 43, 53... Nixie is one crazy cat, or is it really a cat >?<, and what about that 'magic' language, changes, changes, changes; flying carpet, fish, dog.
***

emeaegeiec: code for magic masked in ancient parchments
buried in sand
imprisoned in tall, stone-hard, mountains...
3
Aladdin and the Lamp
'poof'
a magic carpet
2
dropped into the sea, swirling down, down, down, and swallowed
a magic ring, from the three rings, a feline circle
as to what purpose?
Not this story will a reader see.
1
'woof'
look to the stars as the 'dog star' flickers whenever freedom is gained,
only to fall black as wishes run full circle,
to return.
0
magic: lore and story steeped in mystique when really it is all around us.
symbols
words
tools
potions
stories
pictures
results
curses
ha!
even a blind Warlock can see, not in such Hollywood rendition of rending logic can even come close
when it is so easy to ignore what can easily be seen.
-0
a fable, a fairytale, a lie to sooth children to sleep
Washington balancing a budget seems like magic
yet, it still is make-believe.
-1
supernatural seems like magic?
religion of course
Biblical warnings of something else that people also say is not 'real'.
The cat and dog do battle.
-2
Love: Cupids arrow
explained by science as pheromones, lust, biological clock, and what is this word, 'science?'
-3
Magic
magic
emeaegeiece
for one born without a soul knows full well the realm of that which mortals try to control...
the thoughts
unseen yet felt
random yet in full square
ah yes,
the contradiction
the words
the numbers
leading and ending with one committed in an earthly institution
a form of full square
in full battle with another world
yet for this world
a showing of gnashing of teeth
and silence...

Master Critic

Posts: 3595

Joined: September 17, 2008, 10:10:20 PM

Post December 21, 2012, 11:49:12 PM

Total Abandonment

What you are showing me Robin, is that I should write for the joy of it and not really care what hits and what doesn't with the audience.

I have an unusual take on the entertainment I like to experience and naturally, I want to write along those lines. But with all my involved plot development or Mel Brook's type of humor, I'm still not getting to it.

Of course, I don't want an audience to poo on something that is a personification of my soul, so writing while keeping the reader at arms length is a way for me not to be too open. Yet the writing can't be felt unless I put myself into it.

I think the only way to create freely and something that is reflective of who I am is, as you put it, not to care what people think and just write and keep on writing. Iain Muir said something simular to me awhile back.

I'm interested in seeing what happens from here.

Editor Emeritus

Posts: 2528

Joined: December 31, 1969, 08:00:00 PM

Location: Mass, USA

Post December 22, 2012, 06:12:37 PM

Re: Total Abandonment

Mark Edgemon wrote:What you are showing me Robin, is that I should write for the joy of it and not really care what hits and what doesn't with the audience.

I have an unusual take on the entertainment I like to experience and naturally, I want to write along those lines. But with all my involved plot development or Mel Brook's type of humor, I'm still not getting to it.

Of course, I don't want an audience to poo on something that is a personification of my soul, so writing while keeping the reader at arms length is a way for me not to be too open. Yet the writing can't be felt unless I put myself into it.

I think the only way to create freely and something that is reflective of who I am is, as you put it, not to care what people think and just write and keep on writing. Iain Muir said something simular to me awhile back.

I'm interested in seeing what happens from here.


Hi again Mark,

Maybe switch back and forth. Sorta keep track on the pieces you write because you want to, and be ready for random/negative/maybe-positive reactions to those. By being aware it's a risky piece, you are pre-warned not to be crushed by a negative result if it comes in. Then in other pieces put on a "I will write for the audience" hat. You may not like it, but the audience might, which makes for a whole new struggle.

The best analogy I can think of is that the English writer Thomas Hardy once said that he wrote his novels to pay the bills, and he had more fun/meaning writing poetry. Somewhere about his novel Jude The Obscure he annoyed the wrong people and never wrote a novel again, but apparently he had enough means to survive, and worked on his poetry. So maybe trade off, "Write one for me, expect no one to like it, write one for cheap interests, though it feels like a cheap plot".

Master Critic

Posts: 1609

Joined: June 05, 2011, 02:05:03 AM

Post December 22, 2012, 08:42:18 PM

Re: Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski

Yepper Mark,
the joy of writing is in the writing no matter what it is that is being written.
For example:
Striving with effort, strength gained only after much practice
push
push
push
ah, feel it coming?
for some, it is almost as giving birth
creating a new life...
to look down and smile
wiping sweat from the brow
only then to pull the handle
to flush it all down.
*
See? Writing about a bowel movement is highly offensive to some editors/readers and enjoyable by others. As the writer, I had great 'joy' in writing it. Is it good? Is it bad? Hu or (who) cares. As long as you enjoy what you write there will be others who will also like it, or not.
*
As with our earlier challenges, write as you see fit regarding any topic. And so for another challenge to you, read the story and write a poem about Nixie the cat. Write whatever, however, you like and enjoy without thinking what others may think.
I think,
you may like it.

Master Critic

Posts: 3595

Joined: September 17, 2008, 10:10:20 PM

Post December 25, 2012, 03:53:24 AM

Re: Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski

Lipinski wrote:Yepper Mark,
the joy of writing is in the writing no matter what it is that is being written.
For example:
Striving with effort, strength gained only after much practice
push
push
push
ah, feel it coming?
for some, it is almost as giving birth
creating a new life...
to look down and smile
wiping sweat from the brow
only then to pull the handle
to flush it all down.
*
See? Writing about a bowel movement is highly offensive to some editors/readers and enjoyable by others. As the writer, I had great 'joy' in writing it. Is it good? Is it bad? Hu or (who) cares. As long as you enjoy what you write there will be others who will also like it, or not.
*
As with our earlier challenges, write as you see fit regarding any topic. And so for another challenge to you, read the story and write a poem about Nixie the cat. Write whatever, however, you like and enjoy without thinking what others may think.
I think,
you may like it.

After exchanging over 150 challenges with you, I don't know why I didn't see this before. Write for the joy of the writing sensation and not the written work itself. Wow! why didn't I see this before!

It does open one remaining conundrum. In order to experience joy, you must open up and if you do that, you are vulnerable to the slings and arrows of outrageous criticism from those who shoot more from their rear than from their hip. How do you deal with the "wrong type" of criticism, those from the ill informed and or those who spite for sport (like those creeps at Poetry Circle, who you proved wrong and soundly defeated)?

Master Critic

Posts: 3595

Joined: September 17, 2008, 10:10:20 PM

Post December 25, 2012, 03:55:38 AM

Re: Total Abandonment

TaoPhoenix wrote:
Mark Edgemon wrote:What you are showing me Robin, is that I should write for the joy of it and not really care what hits and what doesn't with the audience.

I have an unusual take on the entertainment I like to experience and naturally, I want to write along those lines. But with all my involved plot development or Mel Brook's type of humor, I'm still not getting to it.

Of course, I don't want an audience to poo on something that is a personification of my soul, so writing while keeping the reader at arms length is a way for me not to be too open. Yet the writing can't be felt unless I put myself into it.

I think the only way to create freely and something that is reflective of who I am is, as you put it, not to care what people think and just write and keep on writing. Iain Muir said something simular to me awhile back.

I'm interested in seeing what happens from here.


Hi again Mark,

Maybe switch back and forth. Sorta keep track on the pieces you write because you want to, and be ready for random/negative/maybe-positive reactions to those. By being aware it's a risky piece, you are pre-warned not to be crushed by a negative result if it comes in. Then in other pieces put on a "I will write for the audience" hat. You may not like it, but the audience might, which makes for a whole new struggle.

The best analogy I can think of is that the English writer Thomas Hardy once said that he wrote his novels to pay the bills, and he had more fun/meaning writing poetry. Somewhere about his novel Jude The Obscure he annoyed the wrong people and never wrote a novel again, but apparently he had enough means to survive, and worked on his poetry. So maybe trade off, "Write one for me, expect no one to like it, write one for cheap interests, though it feels like a cheap plot".

I think it's a good idea but first, I need to allow myself to totally open up and not control the writing process. I hope I can do it, cause nothing is going to happen unless I do.

Master Critic

Posts: 3595

Joined: September 17, 2008, 10:10:20 PM

Post December 25, 2012, 04:14:18 AM

Re: Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski

Lipinski wrote:Yepper Mark,
the joy of writing is in the writing no matter what it is that is being written.
For example:
Striving with effort, strength gained only after much practice
push
push
push
ah, feel it coming?
for some, it is almost as giving birth
creating a new life...
to look down and smile
wiping sweat from the brow
only then to pull the handle
to flush it all down.
*
See? Writing about a bowel movement is highly offensive to some editors/readers and enjoyable by others. As the writer, I had great 'joy' in writing it. Is it good? Is it bad? Hu or (who) cares. As long as you enjoy what you write there will be others who will also like it, or not.
*
As with our earlier challenges, write as you see fit regarding any topic. And so for another challenge to you, read the story and write a poem about Nixie the cat. Write whatever, however, you like and enjoy without thinking what others may think.
I think,
you may like it.

I'll do it! But I don't have access to previous issues and so I can't read the story, but I can write a poem from inspiration from your poem.


The Purrrr-fect Companion
By the writer who doesn't know when to leave well enough alone


She walks on delicate tiptoes, swaying hips from side to side,
Looking for a place to lay her head, a master to feed and hold her,
To clear her path as she walks in feline sensuality,
Attracting every Tomcat, Dickcat and Harrycat by her fertile aroma,
Warming them with the heat from her loins, scalding them when she flushes.

It is the sensation of companionship, more than love she is after,
The manliest of keepers felt deep inside her,
An assortment of creepers contented by her purr.
And she by trait must keep moving, searching, seeking,
Until it's late and no master will have her.

The End

Master Critic

Posts: 1609

Joined: June 05, 2011, 02:05:03 AM

Post December 25, 2012, 10:32:36 PM

Re: Nixie By Robin B. Lipinski

Mark, I enjoyed the results of yore answer to the challenge. I read the poem three times and felt three totally different feelings which lead to other feelings: Proof of success in my book.

Two other comments:
1. 'The end' used in your latest writing was not needed as your work lead me (the reader) to anticipate more to come, more that is unwritten except for the typewriter in my head. 'The end', in my opinion is best used when finality is meant, such as the last day President Obama transfers power to the next wobble-head doll, then, 'The End' is appropriate.

2. As to criticism, an example: picking your nose in the comfort of your own [space], extracting the nugget with one final attempt, brings joy of success, until...you see a shocked face spying upon your actions. They give a look of disgust, they judge you, they try to make you feel guilty when really you enjoy your exploration of your body. What do you do?

The same is applied to your writing. No matter what or how you do there will always be a critic. Maybe the criticism is an inspiration to try new ways or maybe they are hostile, who cares.

As to the earlier metaphor, I would offer to share the nose nugget with the spying eyes, or eat it, or flick it, or stick in on my forehead, all very enjoyable to me.

Put your sensitivity into your writing not into yourself when receiving criticism. I have to go do some exploring now and share it in my writing.

Merry Christmas and (of course) Happy new Mayan Calendar!

Master Critic

Posts: 3595

Joined: September 17, 2008, 10:10:20 PM

Post December 26, 2012, 02:39:52 AM

Coming Into My Own

Lipinski wrote:Mark, I enjoyed the results of yore answer to the challenge. I read the poem three times and felt three totally different feelings which lead to other feelings: Proof of success in my book.

Two other comments:
1. 'The end' used in your latest writing was not needed as your work lead me (the reader) to anticipate more to come, more that is unwritten except for the typewriter in my head. 'The end', in my opinion is best used when finality is meant, such as the last day President Obama transfers power to the next wobble-head doll, then, 'The End' is appropriate.

2. As to criticism, an example: picking your nose in the comfort of your own [space], extracting the nugget with one final attempt, brings joy of success, until...you see a shocked face spying upon your actions. They give a look of disgust, they judge you, they try to make you feel guilty when really you enjoy your exploration of your body. What do you do?

The same is applied to your writing. No matter what or how you do there will always be a critic. Maybe the criticism is an inspiration to try new ways or maybe they are hostile, who cares.

As to the earlier metaphor, I would offer to share the nose nugget with the spying eyes, or eat it, or flick it, or stick in on my forehead, all very enjoyable to me.

Put your sensitivity into your writing not into yourself when receiving criticism. I have to go do some exploring now and share it in my writing.

Merry Christmas and (of course) Happy new Mayan Calendar!

Your investment into my need to get it right has been staggering. One hundred and eighty one challenges that I have given to you and over One hundred and fifty challenges you have given to me over the last year has paid off. It is amazing that I didn't see the answer, which is so crystal clear to me now...until now! Without your unwavering support and great friendship, I never would have gotten to the Truth.

01. Write for the sensation of the writing and let the material, the inspiration, the word that needs to be said, the audience need to understand and their need to be entertained or inspired...let all of these things take care of themselves.

02. Explain nothing! DO NOT EXPLAIN ONE DAMN THING! Did I explain that well enough :) You pointed this out to me at least a hundred times in a hundred different ways...and it has paid off!

03. Writing to experience the sensation causes the writer to hit the mark. When the writer feels it, the larger share of the audience will too.The critic will have to work damn hard to spit on good works. That's where I want them. Make them work for the sport of being critical (those who are of the mind to do so).

I appreciate good advice from thoughtful people. The literary hecklers will look the fool (as it should be).

I thank you Robin...greatly!

I know, you know, I do!

Return to December 2012

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.