Nightmares Fell My Fantasy By R.H.Fay


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Post September 23, 2010, 08:49:45 PM

Nightmares Fell My Fantasy By R.H.Fay

I can't believe nobody has yet commented on this rich, gory, perfect piece of poetry.

Mr. Fay is a prolific poet and I've read--or tried to read--a lot of his scribblings since he started gracing the pages of Aphelion (ie: when I heard of him. . .). His stuff is all over the internet in scores of sites.

Most of the time, I can tell it's probably good, but poetry isn't something I know enough about to actually say so.

So I'll say I really liked this one. A whole bunch. More than that, I'm pretty sure I UNDERSTOOD it, as well. Rare for me in a Fay piece.

In many ways, there was nothing original about it. And Mr. Fay used these common Hollywood scenes (from at least a dozen movies I can think of) to create the imagery.

By merely mentioning hideous creatures and chain mail and such, it evoked very clear pictures of what was going on. He knows his audience in this one.

The rapidly shifting mood is also very dreamlike, where you go from one scene to another--sometimes very different scenarios--yet somehow the dream state makes it seamless. If you watched a movie that was really like a dream, you would get lost. Yet there's always a logic to dreams that keeps the thread going.

This poem did that, and though I can't figure out how, I can at least admire it. I wouldn't be a bit surprised to find out that this piece was based on some aspect of a real dream. Especially the very last lines where the observer knows he's been killed, but still has some tumbling consciousness till the moment of waking.

Very real feelings in a cheap Hollywood setting. Without the Hollywood happy ending, of course.

Brilliant.

Bill Wolfe
"I am Susan Ivanova. . . .I am the Right Hand of Vengence. . .I am Death Incarnate, and the last living thing that you are ever going to see. God sent me."
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Post September 24, 2010, 01:19:28 PM

perfect piece of poetry.


Perfect? Probably not, but perfection in poetry may be in the eye of the beholder. I will say I invested a lot emotionally in this piece, and it probably shows. The concept of a medieval dark fantasy was close to my heart, so I certainly strove to do the best I could.

Once in a while, I manage to pen a piece that I think is "just right". I tend to be my own worst critic, so I don't think that very often. However, this does happen to be one of those pieces I think is "just right".

His stuff is all over the internet in scores of sites.


And in various print venues as well. ;)

Most of the time, I can tell it's probably good, but poetry isn't something I know enough about to actually say so.


Neither do I, believe it or not. However, from what I've gathered from other poets, and what I've learned from my experience so far as a published poet, "good" in poetry is often highly subjective. Some may debate this point, but more often than not one reader (or editor) may think something is brilliant, while another thinks the same piece is complete and utter trash.

So I'll say I really liked this one. A whole bunch. More than that, I'm pretty sure I UNDERSTOOD it, as well. Rare for me in a Fay piece.


Thanks, I think. I'm glad you liked and actually understood "Nightmares Fell my Fantasy", but I'm a bit concerned that you say it's rare that you understand my poetry. I try to be less obscure than many other contemporary poets I know, but I will admit to relying heavily on folklore at times. Perhaps I rely too heavily on knowledge of such lore. Perhaps I need to make my poetry clearer. It's something I'll keep in mind, anyway.

In many ways, there was nothing original about it. And Mr. Fay used these common Hollywood scenes (from at least a dozen movies I can think of) to create the imagery.


Ah, my old bugaboo of cliche possibly rearing its ugly head again. At least you think I was able to pull off using common scenes. Others may claim such common imagery is cliche. I'm sure Hollywood imagery influenced my concept for this piece, but I also dipped into the same font of inspiration that filmmakers often draw from, the well of folklore, history, and literature. I admit to being strongly influenced by fantasy literature, some of it on the dark side, as well as fantasy role-playing games. All that went into the pot to create this particular poetic stew.

By merely mentioning hideous creatures and chain mail and such, it evoked very clear pictures of what was going on. He knows his audience in this one.


My audience, in this case, being the fantasy reader/fantasy gamer crowd. Of course, some of this stuff (banners snapping atop tall towers, wooden belfries, a besieged castle, noble knights, burnished plate) comes straight from history. I'm a medieval history buff as well as a folklore nut, and my love of medieval history has been known to show in my writing, from time to time.

The rapidly shifting mood is also very dreamlike, where you go from one scene to another--sometimes very different scenarios--yet somehow the dream state makes it seamless. If you watched a movie that was really like a dream, you would get lost. Yet there's always a logic to dreams that keeps the thread going.

This poem did that, and though I can't figure out how, I can at least admire it. I wouldn't be a bit surprised to find out that this piece was based on some aspect of a real dream. Especially the very last lines where the observer knows he's been killed, but still has some tumbling consciousness till the moment of waking.


No, this piece wasn't based on a real dream, although it could have been one of those pieces I began penning after midnight inspiration, after my mind wandered when I was supposed to be sleeping. I can't recall, but it's likely this piece developed from one of those bouts of midnight inspiration.

The very last bit does have something in common with those dreams of falling, ones that wake me up with a jolt. Oftentimes my dream self tries to scream while falling, but can't.

I did want to go with a dream-like quality with this one. I was worried that the concept of "it was all just a dream" would ruin the piece, but I think it works well enough here. I deliberately set out to go from an idyllic dream to a dreadful nightmare. The mood was meant to change as the situation went from bad to worse.

Very real feelings in a cheap Hollywood setting. Without the Hollywood happy ending, of course.


I'm not so sure about the setting being cheap. It is supposed to be something different from the modern world, and yet something familiar. I could have set this piece on an alien planet, but I don't think it would have had the same effect, the same power. Anyway, cheap or not, the setting seems to work.

Thanks for commenting on my poem!
"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did. I'm going to recite poetry!"

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