What do you think of my Yin Conferation?


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Post August 08, 2010, 05:45:53 PM

What do you think of my Yin Conferation?

I wrote a story about mercenaries from the Yin Confederation. The YC's founders created, by genetic engineering, humans who were all females. They have two types of females. The traditional type of female called ovary females or o-females and the new type called testes females or t-females. The t-female has a females body, except for the fully functionally male genitals. A t-female can get an o-female pregnate. They can do the same to a non-Yin human female.

I'm influenced by Ursula K. LeGuin's book The Left Hand of Darkness. That's a great sci-fi book. You got to read it. I thought that I would create a society that had a different gender make up than our own, but still originally come from human stock just like we do.

I'm also working on a book that takes place in the Yin Confederation universe.

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Post August 09, 2010, 01:26:57 PM

Types of Gender

That kind of situation has a real 60's/70's feel to it. Thinking it over lately, I recall fewer stories with experimental genders.

My question is "what's in a name". Do we currently call those she-males, or is it hermaphrodite? Either way, while rare, I think we have that situation already here among us.
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Post August 09, 2010, 10:36:02 PM

Action/adventure: check.
Setting: check.
Style: terse, crisp, and fast to read, but with a hint of shrillness.
Character development: two-dimensional at best.
Conflict/resolution: absent.

Sorry, Gary, but you haven't given us any reason to care about these characters; they're action figures, not human beings. You have good guys and bad guys and nothing in between. I'm tempted to call this "Charlie's Angels in Space." Well, all right, I just did. I can be a real bastard sometimes. Maybe I'll agonize over that, wondering if I was too harsh on you.

Nah. Well, maybe not, but -- gee, I hate to hurt people's feelings -- but you really need a bastard right now, and maybe you'll thank me later. I hope.

See how that works?
I was raised by humans. What's your excuse?
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Post August 10, 2010, 12:36:55 AM

Was this in one of the stories? I've only read a few so far.
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Post August 10, 2010, 12:51:33 AM

Was this in one of the stories? I've only read a few so far.


Yep. "Jenny Ogiwara and the AntiFems."

Oh, and I forgot to ask earlier -- as to this whole YC thing, have you got a plausible, compelling reason for a bunch of folks to go to the enormous trouble of making a whole such sub-species? Someone besides me is bound to ask sooner or later . . .
I was raised by humans. What's your excuse?

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Post August 10, 2010, 06:45:16 AM

Lester Curtis wrote:
Was this in one of the stories? I've only read a few so far.


Yep. "Jenny Ogiwara and the AntiFems."

Oh, and I forgot to ask earlier -- as to this whole YC thing, have you got a plausible, compelling reason for a bunch of folks to go to the enormous trouble of making a whole such sub-species? Someone besides me is bound to ask sooner or later . . .


Half baked comment here -

There were a couple of stories from that 70's ish time period that invoked the rising feminism of the times. Sadly, I might have known this 20 years ago back when I was fairly well booked up on the classics but ya'know, that whole senility thing kicked in. : /

Wait for it... Uh... my last feeble memory says a starting place to look was Joanna Russ's stuff.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/When_It_Changed
"When It Changed" is a science fiction short story by Joanna Russ. It was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Short Story 1973, and won the Nebula Award for Best Short Story in 1972. It was included in Harlan Ellison's anthology Again, Dangerous Visions.
Plot summary

The story is told from the perspective of Janet Evason. When first returning to the quiet world of "Whileaway", male astronauts are surprised at their awkward and unenthusiastic reception from the entirely female population. It transpires that there was a gender-specific plague some centuries previously which killed all the men, but left the female population untouched. The women, settlers coming from a technologically advanced society, had genetic engineering techniques sophisticated enough to allow them to produce female children.

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Post August 10, 2010, 06:48:36 AM

Joanna Russ

Having got that far, let's take Joanna Russ for 300 Alex!

The Female Man is a feminist science fiction novel written by Joanna Russ. It was originally written in 1970 and first published in 1975. The book was re-released in 2000. Russ is an avid feminist and challenged sexist views during the 1970s with her novels, short stories, and nonfiction works. These works include We Who Are About To, "When It Changed", and What Are We Fighting For?: Sex, Race, Class, and the Future of Feminism.

The novel follows the lives of four women living in parallel worlds that differ in time and place. When they cross over to each others’ worlds, their different views on gender roles startle each others’ preexisting notions of womanhood. In the end, their encounters influence them to evaluate their lives and shape their ideas of what it means to be a woman.

Explanation of the novel's title

The character Joanna calls herself the “female man” because she believes that she must forego her identity as a woman in order to be respected (5). She states that “there is one and only one way to possess that in which we are defective…Become it” (139). Her metaphorical transformation refers to her decision to seek equality by rejecting women’s dependence on men.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Female_Man

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