Editorial and new words


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Post June 23, 2010, 02:30:50 PM

Editorial and new words

I believe I once picked up the term "ResEdit" for this. The source is escaping me, but I think it comes from somewhere in the RPG Gaming lexicon, perhaps AD&D or such, or possibly old SF stories, or even old Commodore Era magazine materials.

Backing my way into how it could possibly mean such a thing, I *think* the basic idea comes from something related to the following Wiki entry:
(Not the Mac software package!)

https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... 28logic%29

Quoting:
...
"# If after applying a resolution rule the empty clause is derived, the original formula is unsatisfiable (or contradictory), and hence it can be concluded that the initial conjecture follows from the axioms.
# If, on the other hand, the empty clause cannot be derived, and the resolution rule cannot be applied to derive any more new clauses, the conjecture is not a theorem of the original knowledge base."
...

Put simpler, taking a propositional rule, keep trying it until it has been checked totally. But then someone changes the rule, so your previous work is mostly useless, and it has to be checked all over again.

Thus for stories, off you go happily writing. Then you discover your alien race has to be *either* reptilian *or* telepathic, but for weird story reasons, not both. So then per Dan, you go back to the Setting O' The Tale, and "res-edit" it to make it fit.
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Post June 24, 2010, 01:46:02 PM

The problem is, Tao, that you just took nearly 200 words to explain what your neologism means. That severely limits its ability to catch on, because it's not intuitively obvious. A neologism has to be more than clever, it has to be useful, and the ones that catch on are the ones where you go "Oh, of course, I NEED that word" without having to spend a lot of time thinking about its origins.

(I like Dan's "back-splice" suggestion, because it does suggest precisely what it means, in the context it would be used).

As to Dan's comment about people putting words together to make new words....well, English is a Germanic language (if only because "mutt" isn't recognized as a linguistic category), and that's a hallmark of the German language. Makes sense that we'd do similar things with our own words.
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Post June 24, 2010, 05:54:01 PM

obvious

Doc's quote
"...it's not intuitively obvious."

Department of redundancy department? or close therein?

just a point of order.

RT

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Post June 29, 2010, 01:55:09 AM

doc wrote:The problem is, Tao, that you just took nearly 200 words to explain what your neologism means. That severely limits its ability to catch on, because it's not intuitively obvious. A neologism has to be more than clever, it has to be useful, and the ones that catch on are the ones where you go "Oh, of course, I NEED that word" without having to spend a lot of time thinking about its origins.

(I like Dan's "back-splice" suggestion, because it does suggest precisely what it means, in the context it would be used).

As to Dan's comment about people putting words together to make new words....well, English is a Germanic language (if only because "mutt" isn't recognized as a linguistic category), and that's a hallmark of the German language. Makes sense that we'd do similar things with our own words.


Then let me change one letter and call it "Rev-Edit". Revision Edit. Should be a snap right? As writers we both edit and revise, so do them both at once.
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Post June 29, 2010, 10:26:04 AM

I almost coined a new word for my poem "Cigar," but I chickened out . . . the phrase "artisan-work" almost became "artisana," and until I looked for it, I thought it was an actual word. Seems like it should be, at least. No matter, I think "artisan-work" fits better.

So, here's another new word for anyone who wants to use it.
I was raised by humans. What's your excuse?

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