The Rebound Effect by Roderick D. Turner


Tell us what you thought of the February 2010 issue.

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Post February 20, 2010, 11:35:11 PM

The Rebound Effect by Roderick D. Turner

I liked this story. It is a fluid time travel tale that keeps you on your toes with paradoxes galore. Characters are well developed and the writing style is superior. Very well done.

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Post February 22, 2010, 01:20:53 PM

I quite like this one two, though I do have a couple of thoughts for possible improvements:

Time travel stories are notoriously difficult to get the pacing and foreshadowing bits right in, but it's essential. A couple of moments here seem slightly unbalanced because things pop out of nowhere.

The other point is that you do a lot with the story. Possibly too much given the short space you have. You've got the discovery of an ability, and a love interest, and some unspecified baddies, along with a bit of a plot twist with the "they were using her as bait all along" angle. The real danger in time travel stories is losing a sense of continuity of story when we lose continuity of time.

Other than that though, I liked it.

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Post February 26, 2010, 11:26:10 AM

I liked the intro! It reminded me of the old detective stories where a Humphrey Bogart type character would say in his office: “That Dame reminded me of a Red Headed fire cracker...she stood like the Statue of Liberty for moment before shutting the door....”

Just had to get that one in-----I loved the intro!!

I loved this story! Loved everything about it! Maybe I’m partial for this story because I love out of time stories, storied that logically jump back in time, then forward in time, love stories across time, etc. To understand my partiality, at one time I worshiped Slaughterhouse-Five
by Kurt Vonnegut. To this day I still love it, and I read it around 1970 or a little later if memory serves me right.

Beyond saying how much I loved it, I can’t critique this story fairly since, as I said before, I just love these stories.

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Post February 26, 2010, 12:50:41 PM

A good, solid story. A tricky topic to write, so the fact that my head wasn't swimming at the end speaks to the skill of the writer.

Only a few quibbles:

1. I thought the beginning a bit rushed. The plot jumped forward from when he was seventeen to four years later.

2. Why would you bring a baseball bat and chain to take care of someone who time travels? Wouldn't a gun (or some other quicker, near-instantaneous method) have worked better?

3. His falling in love at first sight was a bit odd. Then again, sillier things have happened.

Overall, I enjoyed this one.
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Post February 26, 2010, 01:29:46 PM

Good job.

I liked the part where the guy goes home and finds a note that he left for himself, then burns it and finds the ashes of previous notes. This little detail put me right into his head -- "What did I write before? How many times have I done this? And what the hell should I do next??!"

The place where this story fell down for me was the ability itself -- how does someone develop or find this? Actually, though, I think the author was smart to not try to explain it.

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Post February 27, 2010, 02:10:34 PM

I do enjoy time tripping tales, and this one is no exception. I had to read it a second time to get all the jumps in order.

I would liked to seen more about the predators. Who were they? Why did they feel threatened? Were they agents of a cosmic time police force?

Megawatts's mention of Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five reminded me of an old DVD favorite of mine. Especially the scene where the unstuck-in-time protagonist Billy Pilgrim comes to in a snowbank after a plane crash muttering "schlachthof funf."

A nicely told tale.

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