Your Dewy Throne By JB Hogan


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Post February 17, 2010, 09:39:32 AM

Your Dewy Throne By JB Hogan

If I'm correct about what this poem's subject is, I was floored by it.

I won't tell what I think it means, but I'm interested in what kind of take others have.

I had to read it a few times to 'get' it, but once I did, I quite literally sat back and said. . .

"Wow."

Because I really don't know much about poetry, I can't comment on the metrics or the structure of it. But if poetry is supposed to illicit an emotional response, this one got one from me.

It should be published in Cosmo. . .

(The demographic of that mag would hate it.)

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Post February 17, 2010, 12:27:46 PM

Say what?

Wait. You mean you think it's about -- oh. Um.

(Next you'll be saying that "I Touch Myself" by the Divinyls has some kind of sexual connotations.)

Perhaps it should be titled "Ode to the 40-Year-Old Female (Almost) Virgin"?

:oops:
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Post February 17, 2010, 05:44:14 PM

Interesting little piece, is it not?
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Post February 17, 2010, 06:22:05 PM

I think of Queen Elizabeth I when I read this one. It also brings to mind an interesting ditty by Ann and Nancy Wilson that rounds out The Renaissance Album by Windham Hill, something about "my thing is my own/and I keep it so still/all the young lasses can do what they will". There is also a reference somewhere in the song to "my little fiddle must not be played on".

Could the little fiddle and dewy thrown be one and the same?
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Post February 17, 2010, 06:40:23 PM

RHFay wrote:I think of Queen Elizabeth I when I read this one.

I actually had Miss Haversham in mind, but there you go...
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Post February 19, 2010, 10:00:00 AM

Your waining sceptre

The poem, Your Limp Scepter –oops! I mean Your Dewy Throne – is well thought out, easy to read, and states the obvious truth: women own half the money and all of the Dewy Thrones. Yes, life for women is peachy-keen all the time.
As one who hasn’t even held hands in six years, the reason for the Dewy Throne’s Assess Denied status might be found in stanza 3:
“One once won but then betrayed Your priceless innocence.”
Betrayal. Men often believe it’s fun to stab a woman in the back by being a player (to be read as pulling a Tiger Woods), but such betrayals can ultimately make intimacy impossible. I heard that groan – all you guys - “I don’t want to be intimate. I just want to mount the throne.”
There is good news for all men, everywhere (including Tiger Woods): there are women to be found who will gladly allow you to steal their fecund jewel in exchange for money or crack cocaine. So mount up and ride, men of the dark night, grabbing that lush soil with both hands.
Since the house is on fire - at least let us warm ourselves.
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Post February 22, 2010, 02:42:28 PM

Re: Your waining sceptre

bottomdweller wrote:. . .Betrayal. Men often believe it’s fun to stab a woman in the back by being a player (to be read as pulling a Tiger Woods), but such betrayals can ultimately make intimacy impossible. I heard that groan – all you guys - “I don’t want to be intimate. I just want to mount the throne.”
There is good news for all men, everywhere (including Tiger Woods): there are women to be found who will gladly allow you to steal their fecund jewel in exchange for money or crack cocaine. So mount up and ride, men of the dark night, grabbing that lush soil with both hands.


Wow, that sure killed this thread. Hard to top that (pun intended.)

I don't believe either gender has stone-throwing rights when it comes to betrayal. Mankind's cavalier attitude is more than matched by womankind's adolescent justification for doing exactly the same thing. Monogamy is the 'unnatural' element in all of this. Humans generally aren't, it's an imposed societal constraint.

And speaking of sex for money, how many tens of millions is Mrs. Tiger going to get in her settlement? Of course, the bargaining was done in the PreNup instead of a street corner, but the price was still agreed upon, in advance. What do you think that works-out on a fecund jewel-per-fecund jewel basis? I'm sure his fame and fortune played no part in her decision to marry him.

In the poem, the queen is punishing herself more than she is anyone else, that’s the tragedy of it.

Bill Wolfe
"I am Susan Ivanova. . . .I am the Right Hand of Vengence. . .I am Death Incarnate, and the last living thing that you are ever going to see. God sent me."
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Post February 22, 2010, 03:42:20 PM

Her dewy ....

Supposedly, someone asked Ms. Tiger what her husband gave her for Christmas & she said, "300 million dollars". Way to go girl!
I listened to the broadcast apology and all I heard was,
"Blah blah blah I got caught, blah blah I got caught blah blah buy Nike blah blah..."
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Post February 22, 2010, 03:46:26 PM

Pay to Play

Bill's comment about Ms. Tiger brings to mind the time when Keven Costner was caught in the act with a British barmaid. His wife got $130 million dollars - I would have done him for half that, at least before he got the hair plugs.
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Post February 22, 2010, 04:56:29 PM

Dewy Throne

The poem reminds me of Shakespere's in As You Like It:


All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

Except Shakespeare is better.
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Post February 23, 2010, 01:05:48 PM

Shakespeare

Yeah, we got it. Shakespeare wrote better poetry than most of us can. So what?
I like the fact that this poem brings forth such strong reactions. It's worth a read just for the emotional response. Like it or hate it, it's hard to look away.
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Post February 23, 2010, 05:24:24 PM

bottomdwellers comment re throne

I disagree, I didn't find it *that* moving at all and somewhat trite.

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Post February 25, 2010, 02:30:07 PM

Re: Dewy Throne

rick tornello wrote:Except Shakespeare is better.


Apples and oranges anyone?

Bill_Wolfe wrote:.. comment on the metrics

I like poems to have some kind of rhythm, and that is how I try to read them.
'Dewy Throne' made it easy to get into such a rhythm, with alternation of unstressed and stressed syllables (or if you are so inclined, with iambic lines). Essentially I found it possible to read almost the whole poem in that way, with two notable exceptions, where the rhythm is reversed.
One is line tree of stanze tree which as has been pointed out marks the turning point of a life, and is central to the whole piece. The other is two lines further down refering the the first, explicitly stating 'All changed then ...'
That way form nicely reflects content.

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