The Mischievous Troll by Mark Edgemon


Tell us what you thought about the October 2009 issue.

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Post November 11, 2009, 05:54:40 PM

The Mischievous Troll by Mark Edgemon

I woulda preferred something a bit more slapsticky.

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Post November 11, 2009, 05:58:53 PM

You had to see that coming...

I don't usually comment on the poetry as it is a form that is generally beyond my ability to appreciate much less comprehend. I will avoid any remarks on technique cuz I'm not qualified.

But I thought Mark did a nice job dipping into a slimy bag of tricks and pulling out something black and depraved. Some strong dark images, some resonance, no punches pulled.

Good job.
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Post November 11, 2009, 07:06:46 PM

poetry comment disqualification and some

Mr. Unforgibbon:
You claim poetry out of your comfort zone, beyond your ability to appreciate, much less comprehend. I'm just posing a question here, do you like the lyrics of a song(s)?

Poetry put to music, all. Some rhyme some doesn't. Some is inane repetitive crap and others, a story that is thought provoking,and still some just plain old feel good, but it is poetry.

I am guessing the term is off putting.

______________________________

Now my second comment relating to the troll(s) which I mentioned in other sections.

What if the troll is nothing but a bunch of hyperactive, hormonal computer geeks, working together, (Galaxy Quest) just busting our chops for the fun of it? Did any of you not enjoy pissing a few adults off when young? I sure as shit did. This a perfect venue for them. They are invisible and can see the resulting tempest.

It doesn't lessen the negative impact on the FLASH but it just might lessen our vitriolic comments, should this be the case.

This is the type of thing kids, very smart kids, would do not adults.

Unless someone knows something about the perps I will vote Computer Geeks and keep submitting stories 'cause I like the contest/assignments.

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Post November 11, 2009, 07:28:34 PM

RT wrote:

I'm just posing a question here, do you like the lyrics of a song(s)?


I had a Poetry professor once who said the only poets getting paid anything are song writers. I should have pointed out to him that Poetry professors probably do all right too.

Maybe Mark will treat us to a rendition of this poem set to music. :)

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Post November 12, 2009, 09:10:38 AM

The Mischievous Troll

Mark is probably just playing with us - or maybe just playing with himself, but he's raised a lot of serious questions in this little slice of poetry. There are echoes of the same questions in Hitchcock's work, especially the Norman Bates character in 'Pyscho'. It's a woman's job to hold a boy child and raise him, with the ultimate purpose of releasing him to the community. However, what happens when something goes wrong and, held too tightly, he can't escape his mother's 'loving' (oppressive) bonds. Beyond that, are transvestites really depraved - or can cross-dressing be a healthy, alternative sexual lifestyle?
"A gremlin at two, with girls he is through until his mother's death" Really, I've known men who - after their mothers were finally out of the picture - had long term relationships with women that were very successful. I had a grandfather who waited to marry until after his mother died, and was married for 30 years to a woman who adored him.
"It was his decision To hide sin with religion Than reveal his decrepit self" - This happens so much, it is laughable - the turning outward of sin and self-loathing to those whom the see-er would pocess. Often the pointing finger says more about the person pointing, than it does about those around him. The Scarlet Letter. The lay ministers in Missouri who abused children, and were recently found out.
"He waits for hell To reunite with the demon he hates". Hotel California: In the master's chambers they are gathered for the feast. They stab it with their steely knives" (perhaps penis) "but they just can't kill the beast."
Overall, a very nice piece of work for October, when all things are dying or hiding - wondering if they'll still be alive to see the Spring. I especially like the psychological references - those issues which are echoed throughout history.

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Post November 12, 2009, 09:29:38 AM

Re: poetry comment disqualification and some

rick tornello wrote:I'm just posing a question here, do you like the lyrics of a song(s)?
....

I am guessing the term is off putting.


Honestly, I'm drawn to the music first. I can't think of one song I like where the lyrics move me more than the music. I'll tolerate almost any lyrical content if the music is groovin.... Y'all might be appalled at what's on my Ipod.

As a reader, much of poetry--not all by any means--has always struck me as too personal, too inside, with me left sitting in the cold trying to figure out intent. I accept my incapacity to "get inside" on these works as my problem and not that of poetry or poets. As a writer, poetry is just not a form that interests me; I don't get struck by an idea and think, "OK, that's perfect for a poem." I never learned the techniques, etc. So while I can acknowledge compelling imagery or emotional impact in the philistine sense of knowing what I like, I do not feel qualified to tell a poet whether or not her poem "works" structurally or in terms of meter or whatever.
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Post November 12, 2009, 11:18:18 AM

what works or not

Your comments are quite interesting and many poems just don't make it for me either.
However,
I've always listened to the lyrics as well as the music, but the poem in the song is of more interest to me.

As far as writing goes, I just do it as it hits me. Many, many times there is a tune in my head as I'm writing, and the poem is meant for a song, but since I do not write music I can't convey the timing, meter and such.

Pantry Goblins and things like that are just fun poems reflecting, in that case my wife eating the last of the gum drops that I love, me yelling that some SOB stole the last of my candy, and with her reply "it's got to be those damned pantry goblins", and thus a poem was born, laughing all the way. Same with Fiber Optic Eating Back Hoe down the street doing just that.

I used to play in a drum & bugle corp (french horn). I just learned by ear and memorized all my parts, grew up with classical, jazz, Blues, and R&B. But lyrics in all the songs were of interest to me. What were the artists saying, what was the story, from Talking Vietnam Potluck Blues to
The Four Seasons. BTW, Jersey Boys is a pretty good musical.

Life without music is not life, string theory, and all that!

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Post November 12, 2009, 12:02:28 PM

Like a modern-day E.A. Poe's blog,
With no prudish restraints on the dialogue.

Well done, Mark.

gino
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Post November 12, 2009, 12:55:16 PM

Re: poetry comment disqualification and some

unforgibbon wrote:As a reader, much of poetry--not all by any means--has always struck me as too personal, too inside, with me left sitting in the cold trying to figure out intent.


In my mind, poetry like that is bad poetry. I like the catchphrase used by the e-zine Strong Verse - "good poetry is meant to be understood, not decoded". I always try to write my own verse with that concept in mind.

Of course, some poetry today seems terribly hard to decipher. It's as if you need the code book to break the poet's code. And many modern poets feel they must always look inward, exploring the painfully twisted convolutions of their troubled minds. Darn those confessional poets!
"I'm going to do what the warriors of old did. I'm going to recite poetry!"

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Post November 12, 2009, 12:56:44 PM

Re: The Mischievous Troll by Mark Edgemon

unforgibbon wrote:I woulda preferred something a bit more slapsticky.


First, I was not expecting to see a topic of comments on this poem after so much time had passed. I appreciate your putting this work up for discussion.

I get the irony of your statement. After saying you would have rather my last two stories were less humorous and more serious in tone and this poem being entirely serious in nature and subject matter, you said the opposite for comic effect.

Thanks,

Mark
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Post November 12, 2009, 01:23:57 PM

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Post November 12, 2009, 01:28:49 PM

Richard wrote:

In my mind, poetry like that is bad poetry. I like the catchphrase used by the e-zine Strong Verse - "good poetry is meant to be understood, not decoded". I always try to write my own verse with that concept in mind.


Richard, I see your Strong Verse and raise you one Ezra Pound:

"Colloquial poetry is to the real art as the barber's wax dummy is to sculpture."
--Ezra Pound

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Post November 12, 2009, 01:34:36 PM

Mark wrote:

Yes, it is true that poetry is more about self expression and is also the reason that poetry appeals to a much smaller audience. However, I no longer try to understand poetry, but rather just let the verses flow over me and see how I feel about them. It really isn't important to understand what the poet was thinking or feeling or any inside joke or play on words, it is enough that the poem strikes you in some way or another or reaches you with some underlying truth. If it has, it accomplished something for the poet and the audience.


Since I'm into quotes today, here's one to back up your point Mark:

"A poem should not mean but be."
--Archibald MacLeish


:D
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Post November 12, 2009, 01:41:00 PM

Swear in Poesy!

Great thing about poetry is, you can take the same concept that would get you labeled as miscreant, and it comes out art. Jim Dodge (I think) found another way to slide it past censors.

Mark, you're one FupDuck Hermaphroditic FeatherMucker.

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Post November 12, 2009, 01:41:04 PM

Okay, one more quote for the road. I think this ties into several of the comments made about poetry here in the last few days.

"One demands two things of a poem. Firstly, it must be a well-made verbal object that does honor to the language in which it is written. Secondly, it must say something significant about a reality common to us all, but perceived from a unique perspective. What the poet says has never been said before, but, once he has said it, his readers recognize its validity for themselves."

-- W. H. Auden

8)
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Post November 12, 2009, 01:52:53 PM

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Post November 12, 2009, 02:07:34 PM

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Post November 12, 2009, 02:31:31 PM

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Post November 12, 2009, 02:35:33 PM

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Post November 12, 2009, 04:05:14 PM

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Post November 12, 2009, 05:08:49 PM

FYI Mark:

"Archibald MacLeish (7 May 1892 – 20 April 1982) was an American poet, writer and the Librarian of Congress. He is associated with the modernist school of poetry. He has received three Pulitzer Prizes for his work."

from Wikipedia.org

J. "Facts-for-fun" Hero

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Post November 12, 2009, 10:54:29 PM

Re: Kind Words

Mark Edgemon wrote:
Since we are friends, I got to think you meant the above as a compliment. However, the next nice thing you say to me, could it be a bit more uplifting?

Mark


It was quite uplifting. But you need an Urban-To-English dictionary.

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Post November 13, 2009, 09:15:38 AM

Uplifting

I don’t even try to be uplifting. So forget that.
I’m not sure it’s appropriate to just swish away my call for compassion and understanding for the mischievous troll with a “this person is likely warped beyond repair.” What are his bad points? –
1. He masturbates – Yeah, okay. What man could raise his hand high saying he has never touched himself? And could that innocent man have his case upheld in court if they dusted for prints?
2. He’s a cross-dresser. So? One of my ex-husbands was a cross-dresser and the sweetest guy you’d ever want to meet. I just figure that if he can spend 12 hours a day in pantyhose and pumps, he’s more of a woman than I’ll ever be. Now that he has stepped out of the closet in full dress and pearls, he’s (she’s) much happier. Fortunately, she had an open community of friends and family who were there to support her.
Who is at fault here, really – the Mischievous Troll or a society that forces people underground? – a society that says: ‘he has nasty tendencies and therefore “has no worth from the day of his birth”’! I say that each one of us who hammers others into the ground for their ‘depravity’ is lower than this misunderstood, under-loved troll. How dare we send him to a lone grave with demons?

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Post November 13, 2009, 09:28:00 AM

Bottomdweller makes good points.

But I had the sense that we weren't seeing the full picture. After all, he is mischievous. In what way? And he is plagued by a mischievous demon. What kind?

I mean if his sins are little more than wanking and x-dressing, then I'm with Bottomdweller. This poem is a tragedy, and perhaps a little more interesting.

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Post November 13, 2009, 09:36:08 AM

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Post November 13, 2009, 09:49:49 AM

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Post November 13, 2009, 09:51:43 AM

"Mother, did it have to be so high?"
Pink Floyd

I see little or no compassion in the language. I do see reference to sin and hell. It seems some judgment has been passed, coloring the portrait a bit.

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Post November 13, 2009, 10:19:28 AM

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Post November 13, 2009, 10:24:35 AM

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Post November 13, 2009, 01:09:25 PM

Mother

Cool. This is an odd coincidence but - a man in his 40s had a stand-off with cops last night, here in Louisville, KY. The cops came to his house because he was living with his MOTHER, but noone had seen his MOTHER since at least August.
So, the stand-off lasted 6 hours, and when the cops finally got inside the house, they found the rotting corspe of the MOTHER in her bedroom, in her best clothes. She had been lying on her bed, dead & rotting, since May! Question: who DID the neighbors see working in the yard in August!
creeeeeepppYYYYY!
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