A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan


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Post April 12, 2004, 08:57:47 PM

A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

Great story. I had to pace myself when reading this story--I was so interested in it that I began to read it too fast. <br><br>You should try to make this into a television pilot. The main character and the family he picks up should roam Earth in search of others, amidst the ruins of Earth's greatest cities, meeting androids and robots along the way (some friendly, while others not so friendly--because damage was done to their robot law programs, intentional or not). <br><br>This story had many parts to it, and all the parts were intriguing. Thanks for the good read.<br><br>

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Post April 13, 2004, 04:52:53 AM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

Many thanks, and glad you enjoyed the story. I had not thought about a sequel to this one, but it might be worth considering.<br><br>Donald
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Post April 19, 2004, 06:24:13 PM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

I just finished this one...it was very enjoyable. I am always interested in other writer's visions of the future and what apocalypse will come. I liked the idea of humans bringing in animals from another planet that eventually start breeding and maybe become a threat to the natural ecosystems. <br>

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Post April 19, 2004, 08:40:00 PM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

Thanks, Cameron, and glad you liked the story. Now that you mention it, it might have been a good idea to mention the effects those animals had on the ecosystem. <br><br>I've always been fascinated by post apocalypse stories. I think the first such story I read was "Hiero's Journey," a sci-fi/fantasy by Canadian author Sterling Lanier. I suppose my all-time favorite is "On the Beach."
A really good story can compensate for less-than-brilliant writing, but brilliant writing will not save a bad story.

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Post April 21, 2004, 05:07:32 PM

A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

excellently flowing, effortless read with a touch of intrigue and plenty suspenseful. was a bit like Reconstruction in that it too protrayed the last genuine living person, who in turn discovers he wasn't all that genuine to begin with. liked the good continuity (when the bot explodes upon learning it harmed a human), plus the whole Planet of the Robots angle. <br>i take it the ending was that Dawn used Jay to figure out starships so they could take control of the solarwind themselves? or am i being overly negative? <br>also, the ecological element was pretty cool, if brief. reminded me of all-time favorite David Gerrold.<br>Thanks for the Van Vogt recommendations, Donald. Will do!<br><br>Lee

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Post April 22, 2004, 02:53:15 PM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

A E van Vogt's "Voyage of the Space Beagle." is a fix up novel incorporating the short stories "The Black Destroyer", "Discord in Scarlet" and several others but they were extensively rewritten for the novel. If Alien was infuenced it was probably via the novel rather than the short fiction. <br>
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Post April 22, 2004, 03:48:58 PM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

The empty future Earth in this story reminded me of some vintage Arthur C. Clarke (please, nobody say "who's Arthur C. Clarke?"!) -- maybe Against the Fall of Night? -- and even moreso of Larry Niven's A World Out of Time. Stories like this one are fun because (a) it's interesting to see how *alien* old familiar Earth can be, and (b) the reader can't help but wonder "what would *I* do if I was the Last Person on Earth?"<br><br>The technobabble about hypnotol and vitachal didn't quite ring true (although it was less silly than one of those "no, seriously" lecture/conversations in the latter-day Star Trek TV series); the use of honest-to-ouchness hypodermic needles amongst all the super-duper technology seemed odd, for one thing ...<br><br>Kinda odd that this story and Cameron Neilson's "Reconstruction" would both appear in the same issue ... did Cary pick 'em because of the similarities, or in spite of them? For those who haven't read "Reconstruction", it's interesting to compare the relative optimism of "Journey" with the despair of the immortals in "Reconstruction", although in both cases the protagonist awakes in a Strange New World with practically infinite resources at his command.<br><br>(Hmm. Sullivan writing a Nivenesque adventure; Neilson writing something more "New Wave" and moody?)<br><br>Robert M.
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Post April 22, 2004, 10:29:23 PM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

Thanks to all for the nice comments.<br><br>Lee, the story reminding you of David Gerrold is high praise indeed. He's one of the greats. No, there's no takeover conspiracy by the family--they'd gain nothing. Judging from the giggles Jay heard, the conspiracy was to get Jay and Dawn together. Hope you find some of Van's stuff. I think you'll like it.<br><br>Roy, you could be right. Those two stories were published separately, but also were rewritten as chapters in the The Space Beagle. But the creatures in those two stories closely resembled the creature in Alien, even to using humans to hatch its young. Van sued the producer of Alien and won a settlement out of court. I don't recall whether the suit involved the novel or the stories.<br><br>First David Gerrold, and then Robert is reminded of Arthur C. Clarke and David Niven. Wow! I'm flattered to pieces that Journey is even remotely compared to the works of such SF greats. Robert, I thought of pills and gas (both with technobabble names) but ended up with needles. Now that you mention it, that does seem old fashioned. Should've stuck with gas.<br><br>
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Post April 23, 2004, 10:54:25 AM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

Thanks to all for the nice comments.
Robert is reminded of Arthur C. Clarke and David Niven.  Wow!  I'm flattered to pieces that Journey is even remotely compared to the works of such SF greats.  Robert, I thought of pills and gas (both with technobabble names) but ended up with needles.  Now that you mention it, that does seem old fashioned.  Should've stuck with gas.

<br><br>... DAVID Niven?? The actor?? Really, Donald, you didn't have to test the gas on yourself ;)
Last edited by Robert_Moriyama on April 23, 2004, 10:57:27 AM, edited 1 time in total.
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Post April 23, 2004, 12:25:43 PM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan


... DAVID Niven??  The actor??  Really, Donald, you didn't have to test the gas on yourself ;)
<br><br>Arrgh!  :-(   The palm of my hand goes to my forehead.  I couldn't believe that I said that until I looked at my own posting!  Well, at least I didn't confuse Arthur C. with Roy the guitarist.  :-)
Last edited by dsullivan on December 01, 2004, 11:44:44 PM, edited 1 time in total.
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Post June 30, 2008, 04:45:11 PM

Re: A Journey Too Far by Donald Sullivan

A fun story to read, definitely in the tradition of pre-New Wave SF. The name of the ship, The Solarwind, was neat.
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